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Teachers and their international relocation: The effect of self-efficacy and flexibility on adjustment and outcome variables


Clement von Kirchenheim 
Cayman Islands Health Services Authority
clem.vonkirchheim@hsa.ky

Warnie Richardson 
Nipissing University, Ontario, Canada
warnier@nipissingu.ca

 

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Abstract

In this study the adjustment process in a designated group of expatriates, (teachers), who have severed ties with their home country and employer is investigated. Based on existing literature, the value of self-efficacy and flexibility on the adjustment process was explored. It was hypothesised that adjustment would result in reduced turnover intention, increased life satisfaction, and higher job satisfaction. Results revealed the significance of self-efficacy but failed to reveal a significant relationship between flexibility and adjustment. As a result of this study, there are some clear implications for individuals and organisations involved in the expatriation process. From a personal point of view, those who score high on scales which measure self-efficacy would appear to be the ones most likely to find success within the international relocation process. From an organisational perspective, the accurate measurement of self-efficacy may provide valuable information to the employer regarding those applicants that have the greatest probability of adjustment. Given that this study looked exclusively at educators in its sampling, the implications for the staff of faculties of education, who are seeing increasing numbers of their graduates accept postings in foreign jurisdictions, are significant. 

Expatriate, adjustment, relocation, self efficacy, flexibility

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 von Kirchenheim, C.  and Richardson, W. (2005) Teachers and their international relocation: The effect of self-efficacy and flexibility on adjustment and outcome variables. International Education Journal, 6 (3), 407-416.
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