What is SEPEP?

 

 

                                                   What is Sepep

 

 

                                  

Physical Education is an extremely important and valid subject within the curriculum at school for many reasons other than simply governing fitness and health. However, some literature suggests that students are missing out on the recommended hours of physical activity over their entire schooling, not to mention participation in sports and physical recreation outside of school hours. This is quite alarming. As future physical educators, we need to change the focus onto making Physical Education a priority in studentsí learning, by engaging students in interactive and enjoyable learning environments. This can be achieved by utilising a variety of teaching methods and effective pedagogies in the school setting, whilst remaining socially just and educationally valid. One sports program in particular, the Sport Education in Physical Education Program (SEPEP), has an interactive and social student focussed learning approach, that teaches students about the numerous roles and benefits of different sports in both a practical and theoretical sense. This program is designed around being inclusive of everyone but at the same time developing studentís learning. The successful program has been discussed, demonstrated and implemented into the Physical Education lessons through some South Australian Schools and also at University level. The learning benefits of this program are endless, and these will be outlined in further detail throughout the website.

In the emergent SEPEP model, students work collaboratively to explore, examine, experience and understand team sport.  
SEPEP has developed as a model designed to appeal to all facets of learner's abilities and experience relevant to the process of learning, not just the physical. 
 It provides teachers with a model of teaching and learning that is significantly different from traditional instruction.
SEPEP seeks to change the typical pattern of classroom interaction, procedures and principles and to redefine the roles of teachers and students. 
The role of teachers becomes that of answering rather than asking questions as they have more sophisticated knowledge than students.  
As the ones who are in the class to learn, students should be asking questions and 
determining the problems of knowledge that must be solved in order to study a topic in a way that makes sense to them.  
The aim is to maximise students' opportunities to learn by allowing them to ask questions, 
to obtain information relevant to these questions and to interpret this information in light of their experiences.
 
This model of instruction emphasises learner investment in the active search for information about sport (and life) relevant issues 
such as skills, rules, game strategies and social dynamics by collective action with peers, followed by interpretation 
of the information in such a way that eventually it can become knowledge for the students.  
Information is found, discussed, reshaped to fit the context, interpreted and summarised. All of this is done by the learners with the teacher's help and guidance. 
This creates a social and intellectual climate quite different from the one engendered by traditional PE instruction.
 
SEPEP is an innovative curriculum model, increasingly used as a component of upper primary and secondary school PE programs and 
exhibiting many parallels with community junior sport.  
Within normally scheduled physical education lessons, mixed ability teams are formed at the start of a 20 session (approximately) competitive "season". 
 
 
							
 
 
 
 
 
In addition to the aim of helping students learn to become good players, SEPEP encourages students to fulfil other roles such as umpiring, acting as a 
team coach, manager or captain, serving on a sports management board or duty team and working as a publicity officer/journalist.  
As students assume greater responsibility for learning, teachers relinquish traditional 'up-front' direct teaching roles, 
often moving off centre-stage to facilitate social, knowledge and skill learning through a range of student-centred learning strategies.
The SEPEP model is a process with a potential for educating children and adolescents into good sporting behaviour and embodies a number of characteristics:  
 
SEPEP is an innovative curriculum model, increasingly used as a component of upper primary and secondary school PE programs and 
exhibiting many parallels with community junior sport.  
Within normally scheduled physical education lessons, mixed ability teams are formed at the start of a 20 session (approximately) competitive "season". 
 
In addition to the aim of helping students learn to become good players, SEPEP encourages students to fulfil other roles such as umpiring, acting as a team coach, 
manager or captain, serving on a sports management board or duty team and working as a publicity officer/journalist.  
As students assume greater responsibility for learning, teachers relinquish traditional 'up-front' direct teaching roles, 
often moving off centre-stage to facilitate social, knowledge and skill learning through a range of student-centred learning strategies.
The SEPEP model is a process with a potential for educating children and adolescents into good sporting behaviour and embodies a number of characteristics: